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Metaverse Accessibility Via a Metaverse-as-a-Service Model

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Experts claim that the metaverse is the new frontier – a virtual playground for brands and individuals to dive into hyper-realistic experiences.

But how do brands enter this vast expanse?

For starters, building in the metaverse using state-of-the-art technologies like AR, VR, and 3D modeling isn’t everyone’s cup of tea. On top of that, the existing stack of metaverse-focused technologies is largely limited to gamified virtual worlds ridden with limited engagement and integration features.

Hence, it isn’t an overstatement to say that the metaverse – at least in its present state – is nothing more than a blank canvas for early adopters to continue with their tests and experimentation.

MaaS: The Catalyst for Metaverse Adoption

The “as-a-service” model has become the staple of the Web2 ecosystem. These days, no one wants to procure costly hardware and software or install dozens of programs on their devices. From data storage to video editing, the growth of the Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) model is among the many reasons Web2 brands have achieved such immense success.

Accordingly, if metaverse wants to succeed, it needs a similar “as-a-service” model. In this context, the metaverse-as-a-service (MaaS) model can be best described as an enterprise-level solution that allows brands and organizations to build, customize, and expand their virtual presence using new-age technologies.

MaaS can potentially drive the mainstream expansion and adoption of the metaverse simply because it isn’t just limited to helping big brands build equivalents that compete with established platforms. Instead, it works similarly to the SaaS or pay-as-you-use (PAYU) model, meaning organizations that don’t have extensive technical expertise can quickly build, customize, and expand their own metaverses with the click of a few buttons for a small fee. Even small and medium-sized businesses can leverage the metaverse without formidable capital expenditures.

Providing the Building Blocks of Personalized Metaverses

To understand how a standard MaaS platform works, let’s consider the example of MetaMetaverse. This platform allows anyone to create a personalized metaverse with built-in games, governance mechanisms, token economics, interactive and gamified experiences, and much more.

The platform offers an array of features for users who wish to build their own metaverses without dealing with complex technologies and code. Put simply, MetaMetaverse is what Shopify is for eCommerce businesses. There is no learning curve. All features are easily accessible, including built-in WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) and drag-and-drop tools. The platform features an extensive catalog of objects, tools, and textures that users can simply select and add to their metaverses.

Unlike many MaaS platforms, MetaMetaverse also supports 2D and 3D assets import, meaning creators, be they DAOs, organizations, or individuals, can seamlessly upload assets from outside the platform to further customize and build according to their needs. The platform provides the building blocks needed to build full-fledged virtual economies of scale, including but not limited to eCommerce, decentralized governance, and policies, among other things.

From an organizational perspective, every brand wants to create its unique identity – which is difficult to achieve when limited tools are available. Unfortunately, the existing MaaS platforms mainly revolve around solutions allowing organizations to build gated ecosystems that directly compete with existing metaverses. This results in a striking absence of creative and customizable options.

By contrast, MetaMetaverse’s infrastructure empowers organizations to create multiple sub-metaverses within their metaverse. They can then resell these sub-metaverses to generate additional revenue. On top of that, organizations can customize the properties of each metaverse they build, including the capability to add preferred names, descriptions, and URLs for each.

Then there’s the problem of gamification and interactivity, which directly influence user engagement, user retention, and brand growth. Creating gamified experiences featuring in-game tokens and rewards is complex. MetaMetaverse overcomes this dilemma by enabling organizations to use its existing game mechanics and assets to build highly-functional P2E games. 

For brands that want to develop personalized games and experiences, the platform supports the option to build custom games using its large asset library, list NFTs that will be displayed in their metaverses and sub-metaverses, and tweak the default settings to their liking.

The Way Ahead

The only way to achieve widespread acceptance of the metaverse is for MaaS to make it possible for users, especially those not native to blockchain and other emerging technologies, to build their own metaverses. 

Metaverse-as-a-service (MaaS) makes this possible without requiring any coding, empowering brands and organizations to tailor the features and functionality of their products to their target consumers’ specific needs and preferences.

When one peers into the future, it is not difficult to foresee that the path of the metaverse will be similar to the road that enabled the SaaS model to go mainstream. Accordingly, once the concept of MaaS becomes the norm, we will witness the true potential of the metaverse.

Disclaimer: This article is provided for informational purposes only. It is not offered or intended to be used as legal, tax, investment, financial, or other advice

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